Social Media Workshops and Training

Social Media Marketing

What is a social media workshop or training event?

At first glance, event social media marketing sounds like the simple task of advertising and marketing for events.

Create a few graphics... post about it on the company's social media account... create a groovy hashtag... send out a few emails... create a landing page on the website... and you would be right! Those are all elements of event marketing.

However, event social media marketing has the added opportunity to showcase the highlights as they are happening, in real time! And there are fabulous ways to get your attendees, volunteers, and team engaged too.

Why would you want social media marketing for your event?

Event social media marketing doesn't end with the start of your event - instead, it should end much, much later.

Events not just about the lessons of a conference, the networking at a local gathering, or insights to workshops. Events are also about the experience your attendees, sponsors, speakers, and vendors have while the event is taking place!

Think about it.

Posting where we are, what we are doing, and who we are doing it with has become incredibly second-nature for the majority of the population. Why not leverage the exposure that's happening at your event, for your event's benefit?

Social media is another great asset to offer to sponsors, vendors, and speakers! By collaborating with everyone, not only are you increasing the awareness and visibility of your event, but your brand. And in turn, you are able to offer a value add to prospective supporters and investors.

The average Social Media Marketing Manager enjoys staying at their job for 1 to 2 years.

There are over 61,443 Social Media Managers in the United States.

The predicted job growth for Social Media Managers is 10% by 2026.

How can Social Jargn help?

We can create a marketing strategy from your event, start-to-finish.

We can work with your existing team and leadership to ensure social media is entwined with your other marketing initiatives, or create the entire strategy and event campaign with you!

The best part is that event social media marketing is relevant to in-person, virtual, and hybrid events.

Let us create digital assets for your event attendees to use on social media, help you create that groovy hashtag, and showcase your event in style, online.

Done For You

Done For You is exactly as it sounds. Consider Social Jargn your organization's marketing department without the additional costs of overhead, recruiting, and training. From start to finish, Social Jargn takes care of each and every intricacy for your organization. Regular meetings are held to ensure consistency and synergy with your sales team and internal leadership - this keeps everyone on the same page allowing for the best possible results! You remain the property owner for any digital assets created, meaning any intellectual property is yours to use at your discrecion. Services are available on a month to month basis, giving you the flexibility to add or remove projects as they fit your sales strategy and financial budget.

Done With You

Done With You plans are a hybrid between the Do It Yourself option and Done For You services. This tier is for entrepreneurs and business professionals who are looking to keep hands-on with their content and marketing, but need the routine tasks off their plate. For example, you may want consistent posting to be sent out on your social media accounts but prefer to handle comments and messages on your own. Or, you are recording your video footage and need someone to make the edits for you. Perhaps you have a podcast and would like the audio transcribed and reposted on your blog. We work in tandem and Social Jargn fills in the gaps you need so nothing is missed!

Do It Yourself

Sometimes, business owners are unable to hire a service to handle their marketing, social media, website maintenance, etc. but when they get stuck, they need someone to turn to! DIYers benefit from the Social Jargn community where learning is self-paced and questions are answered in video replies and click-by-click walkthroughs. For more in-depth hurdles, private virtual appointments are also available for guidance and troubleshooting.

Join the DIY Community!

Necessary updates and news for successful social media marketing.

Join the DIY Community!

Necessary updates and news for successful social media marketing.

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Why You Shouldn’t Let Just Anyone Do Your Social Media

November 15, 20226 min read

Why You Shouldn’t Let Just Anyone Do Your Social Media

One of the biggest stigmas I fight against as a social media manager is that: anyone can do it.

And… as cringy as it is, it’s kind of true. The phrase makes me think of the theme from the Disney/Pixar movie Ratatouille, which is: “Anyone Can Cook.” Yes, anyone CAN – in the sense that a great chef (aka social media marketer) can come from anywhere. But… that also doesn’t mean you should hire just anyone to handle your social media marketing for you. (Full disclosure, I’m pretty sure I got my first social media marketing position by sheer dumb luck, so… there is that.)

I walk into organizations time and time again where they have tasked their social media to the: secretary/office assistant/office manager/part-time worker/salesperson/whoever-doesnt-have-enough-hours-right-now position. 

Ashley R. Smith - Fluent in Social Media and Owner of Social Jargn, a social media marketing company managing your social media so you can manage your business.

Here’s why that’s a bad strategy:

  1. You’re taking someone away from the primary duties of their job. The second biggest stigma I face is, “it only takes 10 seconds to create a post.” FALSE! It only takes 10 seconds to publish a post. Good social media takes more than just type, upload, click. There’s a solid strategy behind it, working to build your business, and taking steps toward your overall goals. I’ve found either the primary duties the employee is tasked with are getting completed, and social media still ends up not getting done, or your social media is rockin’ but… the things the employee was initially hired to do aren’t. And if you’re doing your own social media as a solo entrepreneur, you especially understand the struggle here. More of this in point #4…

  2. Your sales reps are great at what they do – sales. They make the company money. And social media is a phenomenal tool when in the hands of someone who knows how to use it! Unfortunately, not all salespeople have received this training and social media isn’t sales, it’s social. Veterans in sales tend to be comfortable doing what they do best and without proper training or knowledge, your social media posts aren’t going to look uniform and can come across as too pushy or too sales-y. If you sell, sell, sell on social media your audience is going to stop engaging with you.

  3. Social media is one of THE most powerful tools a business or organization has under its belt. Social media provides a ton of benefits to a business. However, it’s all too common for this to be given to “the youngest person in the room” because… well, their age. The attitude is, “this person knows what they’re doing because they’re on their phone all the time on social media anyway!” And while that may be true and my next statement may be generalizing a bit too much, think about it… odds are, you just gave the keys to THE BIGGEST VEHICLE for your business’s marketing strategy and sales growth to the most inexperienced person in your company. It’s like giving a newly licensed 16-year-old a lamboroghini with a full tank of gas and no supervision or guidance. (Sidenote: we’re reaching an interesting time where younger generations aren’t on Facebook even though your -customers- are, so they really have no better leverage on how it works over their supervisors.)

  4. Maybe you’re doing your own social media due to enjoyment or for budgetary reasons and I will never knock someone from doing what they have to in the infancy of their business. BUT… wouldn’t you rather work on the reason you started your business instead of your social media? I mean, I would MUCH rather work on my business than do my bookkeeping. Yuck. The same should be true for your marketing.

Anybody can do social media marketing

Now, I get it – not everyone can hire a marketing agency to take care of their social media for them (ahem… that’s where I come in) BUT… what should you look for when you’re trying to hire someone? Whether it be an employee, an agency, or (*ahem*) a contractor? (*ahem*cough*cough*)

  1. They have to know their stuff. And you’ll know it if they don’t. Aside from an impressive resume, they talk the talk and walk the walk. They’ll have knowledge of strategies, methods, and common practice in the social media realm, not just lingo and tech-talk. And they won’t be afraid to explain it to you or to teach you how it works. I do the best I can to remove the jargon from the work I do (I’m a social media translator after all!) and will explain how things work in the best way I can to people who may not be familiar with the tech world. Heck, during the first meeting I’m usually able to tell someone a few things that I’d like to implement immediately just based upon the initial conversation.

  2. Know who you’re going to be working with. Most agencies have a salesperson, then will assign you to an account manager, then you have a creative team and those are the people who end up actually carrying out your message. Do you see the overhead here? Not only that, but there’s a lot that can be lost in translation when you’re playing this long game of telephone with this many players. As far as an employee goes – be sure you have a clear communication path for that person so you don’t end up with the same problems internally. When organizations hire me, they get me – I close the sale, I offer recommendations, I build the plan, I communicate with the decision-makers, and I’m the one who executes. Nothing is lost in translation and if there’s an error, I’m the one who fixes it.

  3. You have to like the person, or people, who will be responsible for your marketing. Do you enjoy talking to this person? Could you see yourself liking to work with them? Now, it’s never a popularity contest and even if you do find someone you like it may not be the right fit for your business. But personality clashes are something you really want to avoid. Especially when you start talking contract terms (agencies) or salary (employees). Trust your gut.

  4. They are interested in what you do. If an employee is just looking for a job, they’re going to leave as soon as they think they’ve found the next best thing. I can say this because I’ve done it with past employers until I found what I was really passionate and purposeful about – social media. When I interview a new client – yes, the interview goes both ways – I’m asking a bunch of questions about their business, their challenges, their struggles, their goals, etc. With this information, I give a recommendation for marketing and social media strategy. I also want to know who I’m going to work with and what the division of work is going to be. From my experience, this is a similar process to how most agencies will run; however, most want all of the pie and aren’t willing to only take a slice and collaborate with someone else outside of their agency. I’m different in that I’m open to working with whatever type of team you’ve laid out – even if that means a competitor is involved.

So where are you at in your business? Are you looking at an agency? To hire an employee or create a marketing department? Or is there something I can help you with?

Back to Blog
blog image

Why You Shouldn’t Let Just Anyone Do Your Social Media

November 15, 20226 min read

Why You Shouldn’t Let Just Anyone Do Your Social Media

One of the biggest stigmas I fight against as a social media manager is that: anyone can do it.

And… as cringy as it is, it’s kind of true. The phrase makes me think of the theme from the Disney/Pixar movie Ratatouille, which is: “Anyone Can Cook.” Yes, anyone CAN – in the sense that a great chef (aka social media marketer) can come from anywhere. But… that also doesn’t mean you should hire just anyone to handle your social media marketing for you. (Full disclosure, I’m pretty sure I got my first social media marketing position by sheer dumb luck, so… there is that.)

I walk into organizations time and time again where they have tasked their social media to the: secretary/office assistant/office manager/part-time worker/salesperson/whoever-doesnt-have-enough-hours-right-now position. 

Ashley R. Smith - Fluent in Social Media and Owner of Social Jargn, a social media marketing company managing your social media so you can manage your business.

Here’s why that’s a bad strategy:

  1. You’re taking someone away from the primary duties of their job. The second biggest stigma I face is, “it only takes 10 seconds to create a post.” FALSE! It only takes 10 seconds to publish a post. Good social media takes more than just type, upload, click. There’s a solid strategy behind it, working to build your business, and taking steps toward your overall goals. I’ve found either the primary duties the employee is tasked with are getting completed, and social media still ends up not getting done, or your social media is rockin’ but… the things the employee was initially hired to do aren’t. And if you’re doing your own social media as a solo entrepreneur, you especially understand the struggle here. More of this in point #4…

  2. Your sales reps are great at what they do – sales. They make the company money. And social media is a phenomenal tool when in the hands of someone who knows how to use it! Unfortunately, not all salespeople have received this training and social media isn’t sales, it’s social. Veterans in sales tend to be comfortable doing what they do best and without proper training or knowledge, your social media posts aren’t going to look uniform and can come across as too pushy or too sales-y. If you sell, sell, sell on social media your audience is going to stop engaging with you.

  3. Social media is one of THE most powerful tools a business or organization has under its belt. Social media provides a ton of benefits to a business. However, it’s all too common for this to be given to “the youngest person in the room” because… well, their age. The attitude is, “this person knows what they’re doing because they’re on their phone all the time on social media anyway!” And while that may be true and my next statement may be generalizing a bit too much, think about it… odds are, you just gave the keys to THE BIGGEST VEHICLE for your business’s marketing strategy and sales growth to the most inexperienced person in your company. It’s like giving a newly licensed 16-year-old a lamboroghini with a full tank of gas and no supervision or guidance. (Sidenote: we’re reaching an interesting time where younger generations aren’t on Facebook even though your -customers- are, so they really have no better leverage on how it works over their supervisors.)

  4. Maybe you’re doing your own social media due to enjoyment or for budgetary reasons and I will never knock someone from doing what they have to in the infancy of their business. BUT… wouldn’t you rather work on the reason you started your business instead of your social media? I mean, I would MUCH rather work on my business than do my bookkeeping. Yuck. The same should be true for your marketing.

Anybody can do social media marketing

Now, I get it – not everyone can hire a marketing agency to take care of their social media for them (ahem… that’s where I come in) BUT… what should you look for when you’re trying to hire someone? Whether it be an employee, an agency, or (*ahem*) a contractor? (*ahem*cough*cough*)

  1. They have to know their stuff. And you’ll know it if they don’t. Aside from an impressive resume, they talk the talk and walk the walk. They’ll have knowledge of strategies, methods, and common practice in the social media realm, not just lingo and tech-talk. And they won’t be afraid to explain it to you or to teach you how it works. I do the best I can to remove the jargon from the work I do (I’m a social media translator after all!) and will explain how things work in the best way I can to people who may not be familiar with the tech world. Heck, during the first meeting I’m usually able to tell someone a few things that I’d like to implement immediately just based upon the initial conversation.

  2. Know who you’re going to be working with. Most agencies have a salesperson, then will assign you to an account manager, then you have a creative team and those are the people who end up actually carrying out your message. Do you see the overhead here? Not only that, but there’s a lot that can be lost in translation when you’re playing this long game of telephone with this many players. As far as an employee goes – be sure you have a clear communication path for that person so you don’t end up with the same problems internally. When organizations hire me, they get me – I close the sale, I offer recommendations, I build the plan, I communicate with the decision-makers, and I’m the one who executes. Nothing is lost in translation and if there’s an error, I’m the one who fixes it.

  3. You have to like the person, or people, who will be responsible for your marketing. Do you enjoy talking to this person? Could you see yourself liking to work with them? Now, it’s never a popularity contest and even if you do find someone you like it may not be the right fit for your business. But personality clashes are something you really want to avoid. Especially when you start talking contract terms (agencies) or salary (employees). Trust your gut.

  4. They are interested in what you do. If an employee is just looking for a job, they’re going to leave as soon as they think they’ve found the next best thing. I can say this because I’ve done it with past employers until I found what I was really passionate and purposeful about – social media. When I interview a new client – yes, the interview goes both ways – I’m asking a bunch of questions about their business, their challenges, their struggles, their goals, etc. With this information, I give a recommendation for marketing and social media strategy. I also want to know who I’m going to work with and what the division of work is going to be. From my experience, this is a similar process to how most agencies will run; however, most want all of the pie and aren’t willing to only take a slice and collaborate with someone else outside of their agency. I’m different in that I’m open to working with whatever type of team you’ve laid out – even if that means a competitor is involved.

So where are you at in your business? Are you looking at an agency? To hire an employee or create a marketing department? Or is there something I can help you with?

Back to Blog

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